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Trichoptera: Limnephilidae of Gunnison County, Colorado

Limnephilus secludens

Banks, 1914
Updated 12 May 2017
TSN 116204

Good Links

On this website:
Introduction to Limnephilidae
Introduction to Limnephilus

Other Websites:
Photos, Map, Museum specimens, DNA - Barcodinglife.org

University of Alberta Entomology Collection - Species page
     Has description, habitat information, range and more.

References

Banks, N. 1914. American Trichoptera- notes and descriptions. Canadian Entomologist 46:149-156, 201-204, 252-258, 261-268.
     This is the original description of L. secludens.




Denning, D.G. 1965 New rhyacophilids and limnephilids (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae and Limnephilidae). Canadian Entomologist 97: 690-700.
     Denning described this species as Limnephilus neoaculus. Ruiter noticed the duplication as he worked on his Limnephilus key (see below).

Djernæs,M and Sperling,FAH 2012 Exploring a key synapomorphy: correlations between structure and function in the sternum V glands of Trichoptera and Lepidoptera (Insecta). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 106: 561-579.

Herrmann,SJ; Ruiter,DE and Unzicker,JD 1986 Distribution and records of Colorado Trichoptera. Southwestern Naturalist 31 4, 421-457.
     The authors show this species present in Gunnison County.

McCullagh,BS; Wissinger,SA and Marcus,JM 2015 Identifying PCR primers to facilitate molecular phylogenetics in Caddisflies (Trichoptera). Zoological Systematics, 40(4) 459 PDF

Nimmo, A 1971 The adult Rhyacophilidae and Limnephilidae (Trichoptera) of Alberta and eastern British Columbia and their post glacial origin. Quaestiones Entomologicae 73: 3-234.

Ruiter,DE 1995 The adult Limnephilus Leach (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae) of the new world. Vol. XI Ohio Biological Survey, College of Biological Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 200 pages.
     Ruiter synonymized Limnephilus neoaculus with Limnephilus secludens after Denning named this species again in 1965 (see above).

Wissinger,SA; Eldermire,C and Whissel,JC 2005 The role of larval cases in reducing aggression and cannibalism among caddisflies in temporary wetlands. Wetlands 24(4) 777-783. PDF
     Abstract: " Larvae of wetland caddisflies supplement their detrital diets with animal material. In some species this supplement is obtained by preying on other caddisflies. In this study, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments to a) compare intraspecific aggression and the propensity for cannibalism among six caddisfly species that occur along a gradient from vernal to autumnal to permanent high-elevation wetlands, and b) determine the importance of cases in preventing or reducing cannibalism and intraguild predation. We predicted that cannibalism and overall levels of aggression should be highest in species that occur in temporary habitats. We found that all of the species that use temporary habitats (Asynarchus nigriculus ,Hesperophylax occidentalis, Limnephilus externus, Limnephilus picturatus, Limnephilus secludens) were extremely aggressive towards and cannibalized conspecifics without cases. Species that typically occur in short-duration temporary wetlands were more aggressive than those in long-duration temporary wetlands. Cases prevented cannibalism in four of these temporary-habitat species, and reduced cannibalism among Asynarchus larvae. The latter species occurs in extremely ephemeral habitats where cannibalism provides a dietary supplement that probably facilitates emergence before drying. Asynarchus also preys on Limnephilus spp., and we found that cases dramatically reduced vulnerability to intraguild predation. Larvae of Agrypnia deflata, a species that occurs only in permanent wetlands, were least aggressive and rarely cannibalized conspecifics. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that intraspecific aggression and the potential for cannibalism are highest in species that live in habitats with developmental time constraints. Many wetland invertebrates face developmental time constraints and selection for aggression in temporary habitats should be especially strong for taxa that rely on animal material to supplement a mainly detrital diet."

Brown,WS 2005 Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Gunnison County, Colorado, USA
www.gunnisoninsects.org