Home | Species List | Bibliography


Trichoptera: Limnephilidae of Gunnison County, Colorado

Chyrandra centralis
Pale Western Stream Sedge

(Banks) 1900
Updated 7 Nov 2016
TSN 116018

This is the only species in this genus. It is found in leaves in small spring streams across Canada and south to Colorado, Utah and California. The distinctive case of leaves is arranged to form a lip or flange-like seam along the edge. The larvae's head is round and dark. They also have a large irregular sclerite at the base of each lateral hump and single abdominal gills.

Notes

Commonly mispelled Chyranda centralis.
Synonyms include:
Asynarchus centralis Banks, 1900,
Chyrandra pallida (Banks, 1903)
Chyrandra parvula Denning, 1948
Chyrandra signata (Banks, 1907)

Good Links

On this website:
Limnephilidae Introduction

References

Banks,N 1900 New genera and species of Nearctic Neuropteroid Insects. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 26:239-259. PDF
Described as Asynarchus centralis.



Erman, N. A. 1986 Movements of self-marked caddisfly larvae, Chyrandra centralis (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae) in a Sierran spring stream, California, U.S.A. Freshwater Biology 16:455-464.
      " SUMMARY. 1. The tendency of larvae of Chyranda centralis to mark themselves by adding coloured plastic segments to their cases was used to study instream movements of the species. Plastic strips of different colours were placed at measured distances down a small spring stream and larvae cut pieces and incorporated them in their cases.
2. Over 50% of the marked population moved upstream into cooler water prior to pupation in an exceptionally dry year. The greatest distance moved upstream by a single larva was 56.9m, In a wet year, when daytime stream temperatures were cooler, 11-28% of the marked population moved upstream. Downstream movement occurred in both years late in the fifth instar.
3. Larvae selected yellow in preference to other colours in laboratory tests and they preferred heavy, textured plastic to light, smooth plastic as they neared pupation.
4. Upstream movements, found also in Desmana bethula (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae) in the same spring stream, may be an adaptation for avoiding pupation in areas of high temperature, low oxygen concentration, or intermittent flow."


Herrmann,SJ; Ruiter,DE and Unzicker,JD 1986 Distribution and records of Colorado Trichoptera. Southwestern Naturalist 31 4, 421-457.
     The authors show this species present in Gunnison County.

Hodkinson,ID 1975 A community analysis of the benthic insect fauna of an abandoned beaver pond. The Journal of Animal Ecology, 44(2) 533-551. PDF

Irons,JG III 1988 Life history patterns and trophic ecology of Trichoptera in two Alaskan (U.S.A.) subarctic streams. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 66:1258-1265. Abstract

Wiggins,GB 1963 Larvae and pupae of two North American limnephilid caddisfly genera (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae). Bulletin of the Brooklyn Entomological Society 58(4):103-112.
     Describes the larvae and pupae of C. centralis.



Brown,WS 2005 Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Gunnison County, Colorado, USA
www.gunnisoninsects.org