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Stoneflies - Plecoptera: Nemouridae of Gunnison County, Colorado

Amphinemura banksi - Rockies Forestfly

Baumann & Gaufin 1972

Updated 8 Feb 2017
TSN 102546

Habitat

The genus Amphinemura is holarctic (found all the way around the northern hemisphere), but the species A. banksi is endemic to western North America.

Good Links

On this website:
Amphineura linda
Introduction to the genus Amphinemura
Introduction to the family Nemouridae

Other Websites:

References

Baumann,RW; Gaufin,AR 1972 The Amphinemura venusta complex of western North America. Contributions of the Science and Natural History Museum 226, 1-16. PDF
     The original description of this insect.








Baumann,RW, Gaufin,AR and Surdick,RF 1977 The stoneflies (Plecoptera) of the Rocky Mountains. Memoirs of the American Entomological Society 31, 1-208.
     Quote from page 26: "This species occurs commonly in creeks and rivers. The adults emerge in July and August." Figure 67, epiproct lateral view, 68a epiproct ventral view; 68b epiproct, dorsal view; 69 paraproct ventral-lateral view on page 27. Figure 80 female terminalia, ventral view on page 31. They also mention this species is present in Gunnison County.

Baumann,RW and Kondratieff,BC 2008 The Alloperla severa complex (Plecoptera: Chloroperlidae) of western North America. Illiesia 4(6):66-75. PDF

Kondratieff,BC and Baumann,RW 2002 A review of the stoneflies of Colorado with description of a new species of Capnia (Plecoptera: Capniidae). Transactions of American Entomological Society 128 3, 385-401.
     Quote from page 391: "This species was named from Rocky Mountain National Park in 1972 and is a common species throughout the Mountain region of the state."

Mihuc,TB; Mihuc,JR 1995 Trophic ecology of five shredders in a Rocky Mountain stream. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 10 3, 209-216. PDF
     Abstract: " The trophic ecology of five shredder taxa found in Mink Creek, Idaho was determined in laboratory food quality experiments to assess the obligate or facultative nature of resource utilization among lotic taxa commonly referred to as detritivores. The experiments tested resource assimilation for each taxon among three major resources available to primary consumers in streams; periphyton, fine particulate detrital material (FPM) and coarse particulate detrital material (CPM). Growth of each taxon was determined on each resource in laboratory experiments conducted at 10° C.
Growth results indicate that only one of the five taxa (middle-late instar Dicosmoecus atripes) was an obligate CPM detritivore. The remaining four taxa (Amphinemura banksi, Lepidostoma sp., Podmosta delicatula, and Zapada cinctipes) were generalists capable of growth on at least two of the three resource types. All four generalists exhibited growth on periphyton and CPM resources suggesting that these taxa can utilize both autochthonous and allochthonous resources. Our results do not support the idea that taxa with similar mouthpart morphology, specifically shredders, exhibit similar trophic relationships."


Mutch,RA and Pritchard,G 1986 Development rates of eggs of some Canadian stoneflies (Plecoptera) in relation to temperature. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 5(4)272-277. First page
     Abstract: The eggs of eight species of Plecoptera from Alberta were reared at constant temperatures between 2 and 25°C. All species' eggs hatched at 2°C but none hatched at 25°C. The relationships between temperature and number of days required for development and hatching were fitted to power equations. Slope values (b) ranged from -1.31 for Skwala parallela to 0.03 for Amphinemura banksi; the remainder fell between -0.94 and -0.68. All of these values, except for that for S. parallela, imply that stonefly eggs develop most efficiently at the lowest temperature within the favorable range or develop with equal efficiency throughout the favorable range.

Rader RB; Ward JV. 1988 Influence of regulation on environmental conditions and the macroinvertebrate community in the upper Colorado River. Regulated Rivers: Research and Management 2:597-618.
     Quote from page 611: "The reference site was represented by a diverse fauna of stoneflies (approximately fiften species) with similar relative abundances. However, only rare individuals of Amphinemura banski), two chloroperlid, and three isoperlid species represented the stonefly taxa at the regulated site. A general reduction in stoneflies and the occasional appearance of Amphinemura and Isoperla is common below dams in Colorado (Ward and Short, 1978; Zimmerman and Ward, 1984). Eight stonefly species were collected at the recovery site; however, only two (Amphinemura banski and Pteronarcella badia) were consistently represented in samples."

Ruse,LP and Herrmann,SJ 2000 Plecoptera and Trichoptera species distribution related to environmental characteristics of the metal-polluted Arkansas River, Colorado. Western North American Naturalist 60 (1) 57-65. PDF

Stewart,KW and Stark,BP 2002 Nymphs of North American Stonefly Genera. 2nd edition The Caddis Press, Columbus, Ohio. 510 pages.
     Illustration of nymph on page 184-185, figure 9.1-9.2

"Adventure is just bad planning." --Roald Amundsen

Brown,WS 2004 Plecoptera or Stoneflies of Gunnison County, Colorado
www.gunnisoninsects.org